How to Handle a Deposition in Your Workers’ Compensation Case

Robyn K. Factor
Helping Rhode Island personal injury and work injury clients get the results they deserve since 1994.

If you are fighting to collect Rhode Island workers’ compensation benefits after an injury on the job, you may have to attend a deposition before your claim can be settled. A deposition is a recorded question and answer session given under oath. The company’s insurance attorney will be asking questions about the accident, your injuries and symptoms, your current condition, and your time off work, and you will have to provide the answers. Rhode Island Workers' Compensation Lawyers Kirshenbaum & Kirshenbaum

How to Prepare for Your Workers' Compensation Deposition

A deposition gives both attorneys a chance to gather information about your injury, but it also allows them to see what kind of witness you would make at trial. If you seem like a reasonable and authentic person, the insurance company is more likely to settle rather than take the chance of losing in court. However, if you make mistakes such as becoming agitated or telling a lie, you run the risk of hurting your credibility—and your case.

Here are a few things you can do to ensure that your deposition goes as smoothly as possible:

Listen carefully.

Let the lawyer ask a complete question before you start to answer. Questions may be phrased in a way that is confusing or require information other than what you’re expecting. Always pause before answering to make sure the whole question has been asked and to give your lawyer the opportunity to object to an improper question.

Answer clearly.

A court reporter will be writing down everything that is said for later reference, so avoid nonverbal responses (such as nodding), and make sure you speak clearly.

Keep answers short.

It is usually best to answer questions with a simple yes or no. Resist the temptation to offer a long explanation or to give too much information. You should also avoid sharing any information that is confidential or privileged between you and your attorney.

Don’t make guesses.

If you don’t understand a lawyer’s question, you can ask the lawyer to repeat it or rephrase it. If you don’t know the answer to a question, don’t make a guess. It’s perfectly acceptable to respond, “I don’t know” or “I can’t remember.”

Have You Been Injured On The Job In  Rhode Island?

If you've been hurt at work you need to speak with an experienced workers' compensation lawyer as soon as possible. Please contact us online or call our Cranston office directly at 401.946.3200 to schedule your free consultation. We help work injury victims in Providence, Warwick and all areas of Rhode Island.

 

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