Why shouldn’t I post on social media after an injury?

Social media is a great way to stay in touch with your friends and family, so it may seem like a good idea to tell everyone about your accident by posting on Facebook or Twitter. However, this common mistake can hurt your chances of obtaining compensation, and it can make it much harder for you to win damages in an injury lawsuit. How social media affects personal injury claims

How Social Media Can Hurt Your Personal Injury Case

It’s only natural to want to reassure your friends that you are all right after an injury, but it is important to realize that anything you post online can be used as evidence in your injury case, even if it is unrelated to the accident. Nearly everything you post can be used against you in some way, including:

  • What you say. Your own words can easily be used to poke holes in your injury case. Some people cope with trauma by making jokes about the accident, which the defense attorneys may take literally. Even if you post something positive about feeling much better after changing doctors or taking a new medication, the defense attorneys may use it to undermine the seriousness of the injuries you have.
  • How you look. Any photos you share—or that others share of you—can be used as evidence. Pictures of you having a drink, attending a party, or even smiling can potentially be harmful to your case.
  • Where you are. People who have been severely injured in a crash often take weeks to recover, and it can be a long and frustrating process. While it is a good idea to socialize with friends and visit relatives, any pictures that show you on vacation or out of town recuperating can be used as evidence that your injuries are not serious.
  • What you’re doing. Pictures that show any physical activity should be kept off of social media. Obviously, a person who is seriously injured would not engage in skiing or running a marathon, but even necessary or low-impact activities (such as raking leaves or walking the dog) may be seen as evidence that you are not in any pain.

It’s important to suspend your Facebook and social media accounts until after your case is concluded. If you cannot do that, you should adjust your privacy settings, so that only a small number of people can access your account. For more help on your claim, contact Kirshenbaum & Kirshenbaum via our online contact form to schedule a no-cost initial consultation.